We’re a registered NDIS provider operating out of Sydney, NSW

What is the NDIS?

National Disability Insurance Scheme is called the NDIS and is a new way to help people with disability get the care
and supports they need. It is a free, national system so it will be the same for people all over Australia.

What is a Registered Provider?

A registered provider meets the NDIS quality and safeguard standards. If you decide to use a provider that is not registered, ensure they have the correct qualifications, training and safety checks.

Registration provides some assurance to NDIS participants that the provider’s services and supports meet the level of quality and safety.

What is a Participant?

People with disability who get support
from the NDIS are called “participants”.

     Eligibility

Eligibility

The NDIS is for people with disability who live in Australia and-Are under 65 years of age when they first access the NDIS.

Are an Australian citizen OR a permanent resident, OR a New Zealand citizen who is a Protected Special Category Visa holders Have a disability that will not go away, is ‘lifelong’ and affects their ability to take part in everyday activities.

For people who are not eligible, the NDIS may be able to link them to find other suitable supports.

 

NDIS Code of Conduct

Choice and Control

In the past, many people with disabilities in Australia often felt excluded from
community life, and had little choice in how their supports were provided. In
the NDIS, participants can decide what supports they want and how they
receive them.

NDIS key words

Permanent and significant disability: 

A permanent disability means your disability is likely to be lifelong. A significant disability has a substantial impact on your ability to complete everyday activities.

Supports and services:
Assistance or products that help a person in their daily life and help them participate in the community and reach their goals.

Early intervention: Providing support to a person, either a child or an adult, as early as possible to reduce the impacts of disability or developmental delay and to build their skills and independence.

 

 

Reasonable and Necessary Support

The NDIS will pay for support that is related to the disability, is necessary, and
will help a person reach their goals and dreams, and help people to become more independent.

 

What the NDIS won’t fund

The NDIS will not fund anything that-

is not related to the person’s disability
relates to day-to-day living costs that are not related to the person’s support needs

should be funded by another agency, such as education, health or housing

is likely to cause harm to the participant or to others.

Children with disabilities

The NDIS can also help you get early support for a child with a disability. Earlysupport may help to reduce the long-term impact of disability on you or yourchild. The NDIS calls this “early intervention”.

 

People with disability and their families

The needs of people with disability, including their choices and decisions are
central in the NDIS making a plan to support them, but the role of families is also important.

People with disability can invite family and other supporters to help them with the NDIS planning process.

A Planner will think about ways to assist family to give ongoing support and will take into account the family’s role when making plans with participants, including the support they provide, other responsibilities, and their own life plans.

NDIS Planners will also take into account that people with disability may want the support of family to make informed decisions, and they value their views, knowledge and experience.

If you need an interpreter

If you need an interpreter to ask a question or find out more, call TIS on 131 450 and ask to
be connected to the National Disability Insurance Scheme, 1800 800 110.

What the NDIS won’t fund

You can use the NDIS Access checklist to see if you might be eligible to receive assistance from the NDIS.
https://www.ndis.gov.au/applying-access-ndis/am-i-eligible

Pre-planning

People can start thinking and planning now about how they want to live their life and what help they will need to do
this. There is an NDIS planning workbook that people can complete to help them get ready for the planning process.
Copies of the workbook are on the NDIS website. This has been translated into the following languages- Spanish,
Vietnamese, Arabic, Greek, Italian, and simplified and traditional Chinese.

Working with an NDIS Planner

When you are notified that you are eligible for the NDIS you will receive a planning kit. The planning kit explains the
planning and assessment process and includes a participant statement that should be completed before the planning
and assessment process.

If people need assistance such as an interpreter or translated materials, the NDIS can help
organise this. You can also request to have materials translated if you need them for these meetings.

There will be a variety of ways you can develop your NDIS plan, including meeting with an NDIS planner. The NDIS
helps you discuss your needs, goals and aspirations and the supports you currently receive.

This may take more than
one conversation and you can have someone with you for support.

Using this information, the NDIS will then
develop a plan of supports that best meets your needs and your goals.

You can invite other people to support and
assist you during the planning process.

Still not sure where to start?

References

ndis.gov.au

amparo.org.au

Frequently Asked Questions

What is an NDIS provider?

 NDIS providers are individuals or oranisations that deliver a support or service to a participant of the NDIS.

Is Loyal Aid an NDIS provider?

Yes, Loyal Aid Australia is a registered NDIS Provider.

What types of support are funded by the NDIS?

There are many supports available from many specialist NDIS providers, based on what your needs are in relation to your disability. These supports span from practical daily living arrangements through to modifications in your home. You can find out more about the range of supports here. We are also happy to answer your questions.

What types of support are provided by Loyal Aid Australia?

We are registered to provide Support Coordination, Psychosocial Recovery Coaching, Assistance with Household Tasks, Assistance with Community Participation and Interpretation and Translation services.

What is an NDIS Capacity Building Supports budget?

A support that enables a participant to build their independence and skills so they can participate in community, social and recreational activities. This may include employment-related support, training and assessments that help you find and keep a job, such as the School Leaver Employment Supports (SLES). 

What is an NDIS Core Supports budget?

A support that enables a participant to complete activities of daily living and enables them to work towards their goals and meet their objectives. Transport and assistance with household tasks are examples of core supports.

Do You Provide Emergency Services?

We do not provide emergency services; if you require emergency support, please contact Emergency Services on 000

Does Loyal Aid Australia provide services for non-NDIS customers? 

At this stage, we are only providing services to 17 y.o. to 65 y.o. participants with NDIS plans that are Plan, NDIS or Self-Managed. We provide free advice and help you understand how to navigate NDIS access process.

How do I get started with Loyal Aid Australia?

Getting started is easy…

  • Book an Appointment to review your NDIS plan
  • Discuss with us your circumstances and needs
  • We’ll work with you to activate & implement your NDIS plan
  • Live your life the way you want

You can fill in a referral form to get started.

How do I know which Allied Health Professional is right for my care needs?

Your doctor can help you decide if an allied health service is right for you. Try to be open and honest about your needs and mention your allied health needs during your NDIS planning or review meetings. Loyal Aid Australia team can assist connecting you with Allied Health Professionals.

 What is the process after a person is granted access?

If a person is deemed eligible for the NDIS, an NDIS representative (such as a Local Area Coordinator or an NDIA planner) will contact the participant to gather information to develop an NDIS plan. NDIS plans are built in accordance with the participant’s immediate needs, and their medium to longer-term goals. All supports in an NDIS plan must be reasonable and necessary and related to their disability. Funds will be approved to help a person to have an ordinary life and increase their social and economic participation.

The NDIS plan will detail how the funding is expected to help the person. The NDIS places great emphasis on building an individual’s independence and many NDIS plans will specify supports that build a person’s ability to develop their skills and independence. Equipment, home and/or vehicle modifications are considered an investment in a participant’s increased independence.

What happens if an NDIS participant turns 65?

If an NDIS participant is receiving support and reaches the age of 65, they can choose to stay as an NDIS participant and continue to receive the supports in their plan or they can choose to leave and access supports provided by the aged care system. If they are from an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander background, they are able to switch at 50 years of age. If they do choose to move to the aged care system, they are unable to return to the NDIS.

What address can doctors send medical documents to?

Medical information can be sent through email, post or be delivered in person into a local NDIS office. To send it by mail: GPO Box 700, Canberra, ACT 2601 To send it by email: NAT@ndis.gov.au If sending items through post, it is recommended that a photocopy is made.

How are your Fees calculated?

NDIS hourly rates for Assist Life stage Transition (Support Connection and Coordination of Support), Household Tasks, Community Participation, Interpretation and Translation determines Loyal Aid Austrlia’s service fees and they will be described in our Service Agreement which will be discussed with you during our initial appointment. 

How Does the NDIS Planning Process work?

The planning process is centred around establishing your ongoing and future needs by looking at your current supports and reports and assessments from providers as well as your future goals. You can find out more here.

What do I need to know about my NDIS plan review?

Plan reviews are usually done each 12 months, or if your needs have changed. Occasionally plans can extend for 3 years if your circumstances are unlikely to change. They can be done in person or over the phone and you are able to have a support person, such as a family member or advocate with you. 

How are your Fees calculated?

NDIS hourly rates for Assist Life stage Transition (Support Connection and Coordination of Support), Household Tasks, Community Participation, Interpretation and Translation determines Loyal Aid Austrlia’s service fees and they will be described in our Service Agreement which will be discussed with you during our initial appointment. 

Does Loyal Aid Australia Charge a Travel Feel?

Travel fees are charged as per the NDIS Price Guide. These fees are subject to change according to the NDIS Price Guide.

What do I need to know about COVID-19?

We have a COVID-19 Safety Plan and are committed to keeping you safe.

The NDIS commission and the Department of Social Services have a great resource updated regularly, and you can access it here: https://www.ndiscommission.gov.au/resources/coronavirus-covid-19-information

 https://www.dss.gov.au/disability-and-carers/information-and-referrals-for-people-with-disability-and-their-supporters-about-coronavirus-covid-19

Am I eligible for NDIS Access?

Funding through NDIS may be available for Australian citizens living in Australia, and residents holding a permanent visa who:

  • have a permanent disability that significantly affects their ability to take part in everyday activities
  • are aged less than 65 when they first access the scheme. You can check your eligibility at www.ndis.gov.au

If you need support now to reduce future needs, you may also be eligible. You can find out more through the NDIS here

We are also happy to help you find the answers for your specific circumstances.

Can I submit a referral as a carer?

Yes, you can access and submit our online referral form which is available on our Referral page

What are Allied Healthcare Professionals?

Allied health practitioners are trained professionals who are not doctors, dentists or nurses. They can help you manage your physical or mental health, through services that include diagnosis, treatment or rehabilitation. 

Allied Healthcare Practitioners include: 

Psychologists, Physiotherapists, Chiropractors, Speech pathology, Podiatrists, Occupational therapists, Pharmacists, Social workers, Osteopaths, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health practitioners, Optometrists, Accredited exercise physiologists, Medical radiation practitioners and Chinese medicine practitioners.

What happens after an NDIS plan is approved?

Once a plan is approved, a Local Area Coordinator or a funded Support Coordinator will help the participant to access other government and community services; to select providers to provide services to them and develop Service Agreements with these providers; and to understand how to track expenditure of NDIS funds throughout the life of their plan.

Are copies of plans automatically supplied to GPs and health professionals?

No. GPs and health professionals should ask participants to bring a copy of their NDIS participant plan to a subsequent consultation. It may be useful to be aware of what services can be purchased by the participant with NDIS funds, as these may complement those already available through Medicare.

Is the Disability Support Pension and the NDIS linked?

While both the Disability Support Pension (DSP) and the NDIS provide support for people with disability, they perform very different functions and have different assessment criteria. Therefore, an application for a DSP cannot be used as part of an application for the NDIS. Assistance from the NDIS is not means tested and has no impact on income support such as the Disability Support Pension.

Can NDIS funds be used to pay the gap for Medicare services?

No. The NDIS is not designed to fund supports more appropriately funded or provided by the health system. NDIS funds cannot be used to pay Medicare gap fees. A support the NDIS pays for is not claimable against any other Commonwealth Program such as Medicare.

 

NDIS Terms and Definitions

Common NDIS words and phrases

Access Request Form (ARF)

To apply for the NDIS, the NDIA needs to know some information about you. The Access Request Form provides the NDIA with the information they need to work out if you are eligible.

Carer

A carer is someone who provides care or support to a person with a disability, but they are unpaid. Carers are often family members or guardians.

Full rollout (full scheme)

This is when the NDIS will be available across Australia which is expected to be by 2020.

Goals

Things a participant wishes they could do or achieve in the future, with the help of the NDIS. This might be finding a job, moving out of home, or becoming more independent.

Informal supports

Families, friends, and the community can play an important part in the lives of people with a disability. Support provided by these groups of people can be referred to as informal supports.

Mainstream services

Mainstream services are for all people with or without a disability. They include health, mental health, education, housing, child protection, employment services, and others.

NDIA (National Disability Insurance Agency)

This is the name of the organisation that the government has set up to run the NDIS across Australia.

NDIA Planner

This is the name given to the NDIA staff who work with people with a disability to develop a plan. They also undertake reviews of plans.

NDIS (National Disability Insurance Scheme)

This is the new national scheme for supporting people with permanent and significant disability which impacts on their ability to take part in everyday activities.

NDIS Plan

Every NDIS participant has an NDIS plan. You will receive this after you have your planning meeting.

Your plan will include information about:

  • Your disability
  • Your day-to-day activities
  • Where you live and who you live with
  • Supports you get from family and friends
  • Disability supports and services
  • How much funding the NDIS will give you to pay for supports
  • Your goals

NDIS price guide

Prices for reasonable and necessary supports are listed in the NDIS price guide.

The price guide is developed, published, and updated by the NDIA. There are different price guides depending on the State and Territory.

Provider

A provider is a person or an organisation that delivers services and supports to participants of the NDIS. Loyal Aid Australia is an NDIS provider.

Reasonable and necessary supports

The NDIS provides funding for supports that are ‘reasonable and necessary’. Reasonable means something fair and necessary means something you must have.

Registered provider

Is a person or organisation that delivers supports to NDIS participants who has met certain requirements set by the NDIA.

These requirements include experience, qualifications, approvals, capacity to provide the approved supports, and quality standards of the state or territory in which they are in.

Loyal Aid Australia is a registered NDIS provider.

Self management

This is when a participant and their family manage the funding and supports in their NDIS plan.

Service Agreement

This is a written agreement created with a service provider that sets out:

  • What supports the participant will receive from the provider
  • How and when supports will be provided
  • The cost of these supports
  • How long the agreement will last

Support Coordinator

When you have an NDIS plan, you can decide which service providers you work with.

Some people find and coordinate their services themselves, but it can be quite difficult. That’s when Support Coordination might be included in your NDIS plan.

Support Coordinators can help find mainstream and other disability services.

Loyal Aid Australia offers Support Coordination services.

Common NDIS words and phrases (Continued)

Choice and control

Choice and control is a term used a lot with the NDIS. It means participants are able to make their own decisions. They will get to choose when and where they receive these supports and which disability service providers they work with.

Early intervention

Early intervention support can be for both children and adults. It is about providing support at the earliest possible stage to reduce the impacts of disability or developmental delay.

Functional impact

Describes a person’s disability and how it has an affects their day-to-day life.

Inclusion

This is about how a person takes part in their local neighbourhood and community. You can do this in many ways such as joining a club, volunteering, having a job, doing a course, and much more.

Local Area Coordinator (LAC)

LACs are local organisations working in partnership with the NDIA. They help participants write and manage their plans and also connect participants to mainstream services and supports. In NSW these partner organisations include St Vincent de Paul, Uniting, and Social Futures.

Myplace

Is the name of the online portal for the NDIS. The portal allows participants to see their plan, manage their services, and request payments. To access the portal, participants need to set up a myGov account. Providers also use the portal to make claims for support provided.

NDIS Quality and Safeguards Commission

This Commission is a new independent Commonwealth agency. It was set up to improve the quality and safety of NDIS supports and services.

Nominee

If a person doesn’t have a parent or guardian they might appoint a Nominee to act and make decisions for them.

Participant

Often people who have an NDIS plan are referred to as an NDIS participant.

Permanent and significant disability

To receive funding from the NDIS, a person’s disability must be both permanent and significant.

This means that their disability is one that they will have for all of their life, and one that affects their ability to take part in everyday activities.

Planning process

This is the process where an NDIS participant will work with a Local Area Coordinator or an NDIA planner to plan what supports they need from the NDIS so that they can achieve their goals.

Plan review

An NDIS participant’s plan will generally be reviewed after 12 months. At this time the NDIA will contact the participant to check if their supports are working well and if they are making progress towards their goals.

A person can also request a review of their plan at any time if their situation has changed or if they are not happy with what is in their plan.

Provider

A provider is a person or an organisation that delivers services and supports to participants of the NDIS. Loyal Aid Australia is an NDIS provider.

Reasonable and necessary supports

The NDIS provides funding for supports that are ‘reasonable and necessary’. Reasonable means something fair and necessary means something you must have.

Registered provider

Is a person or organisation that delivers supports to NDIS participants who has met certain requirements set by the NDIA.

These requirements include experience, qualifications, approvals, capacity to provide the approved supports, and quality standards of the state or territory in which they are in.

Loyal Aid Australia is a registered NDIS provider.

Self management

This is when a participant and their family manage the funding and supports in their NDIS plan.

Service Agreement

This is a written agreement created with a service provider that sets out:

  • What supports the participant will receive from the provider
  • How and when supports will be provided
  • The cost of these supports
  • How long the agreement will last

Support package

The word used by the NDIA to describe the funding any person receives for their supports.

 

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